Concentrations

BA in Sociology

Anees Mokhiber, 2014

Anees Mokhiber

What work are you doing now?

Currently, I am in my second year at George Mason University School of Law. My courses range from the study of Immigration Law to Products Liability. I am in the process of applying to internships for this upcoming summer, ideally to gain experience in the field of International Law.

What do you like about it?

Studying the legal world from different vantage points and learning how the law pervades each facet of society has been enlightening. The law serves as a unifying aspect to each societal domain. No matter where you look, the law is there, either as a guiding hand or a wolf in sheep’s clothing. For better of worse, the law has its mooring widespread. That being said, I love the process of having my eyes opened to the ever-present influence of the law. My legal studies have provided me with yet another lens through which I can observe society more analytically and more realistically. Perhaps the lens that is most needed for someone looking to exact influence on several of society’s most tender compartments.

How did a BA in Sociology prepare you to do this work?

My sociology major was incredibly influential, both in my decision to attend law school and my approach to learning in school. Through my study of sociology I came to understand the nuances of the world around me. I also came to appreciate that there are certain critical issues that face our society, which shape our society, that I can confront with the law as my weapon of choice. Currently, I am discovering that my approach to learning Sociology was a precursor to my approach in law school. Studying Sociology broadened my perspective on analysis and interpretation of the societal phenomena that shape our world, cultivating my appreciation for the influence of subtlety, history, and human thought. Those skills have proven critical in law school, as I am constantly required to analyze and interpret statutes, laws, policies, constitutions, and judicial opinions. My philosophy major has come in handy as well and, in some ways, I like to think I followed the trail blazed by Alfred Schutz, who was pioneer in both Sociology and Philosophy, on his way to practicing International Law.

What advice would you give to current Sociology students about developing their careers?

Be intentional in your course selection. Choose the classes that interest you and come to see, after class, how the material you are learning is pertinent to daily life. Sociology is such a critically relevant field, that you cannot help but to experience empirically. Appreciate that. Come to see your studies in real life, watch society before you and keep your sociologist cap on as you observe the world running before you. Also, as you study Sociology, and come to understand the world better, find the parts of our society in which you want to become most involved. Forgive the cliché, but listen to your heart, and let it guide you, along with your studies, to a path that will allow you to make an influence on society. Sociology allows you to see society for what it is, how it is, and how it became that way. Your responsibility is to use your awareness of our world to discover how you can impact both how society is, and how society will be. Your awareness, by way of Sociology, can open the eyes of thousands, let it.

 

 

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