Mason at AFSAM 21

Mason folklore faculty, students, and alumni participated last month in the 133rd Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society both in Harrisburg, PA and online.

Mason at AFSAM 21

Mason folklore faculty, students, and alumni participated last month in the 133rd Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society both in Harrisburg, PA and online.

Professor Lisa Gilman gave a presentation entitled, Whose Culture? Whose Responsibility? Gender, Power, and Class in Southern African Cultural Preservation Initiatives, as part of a larger session on Heritage Studies and Folkloristics. Gilman also offered her expertise as editor of the Journal of American Folklore on the panel Meet the Editors: Demystifying the Journal Publishing Process.

Associate Professor Debra Lattanzi Shutika shared her experiences on two panels: How to Be a Folklorist in the Public Square (and Make People Pay Attention) and Write Folklore's Future: An Op-Ed Workshop. Associate Professor Benjamin Gatling presented Entangled Heritage: Tourism, Vernacular Religion, and Wedding Rituals in Hisor, Tajikistan as part of a panel on Tourism and Heritage Discourses. Kim Stryker presented on Pandemic Pedagogy: What We’ve Learned and What We'll Carry Forward, and Professor emerita Margaret R. Yocum served as a discussant on the Dan Crowley Memorial Panel: Discussion of Milbre Burch's Holding Up the Sky.

Mason folklore students were also active at the conference. Recent graduate, Claire Denny, shared her experiences alongside Mason Arts Management faculty and folklore affiliates, Karalee Dawn MacKay and Carole Rosenstein, in the session, Partnerships Between Folklore & Arts Management Programs in Higher Education: Theory, Practice, and Virtual Internships at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. The session focused on the festival management partnership between the Folklore and Arts Management programs in conjunction with the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural.

Leigh Wynn participated on the panel Asians and the Global Pandemic: Race, Invisibility, and the Urgency of Asian American Folklore Studies. Recent graduates, Sarah Birns and Teo Rogers, also shared their experiences with fieldwork during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic on the panel Fieldwork in Crisis: Conversations and Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic.