College of Humanities and Social Sciences
College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Eric Gary Anderson

Eric Gary Anderson

Eric Gary Anderson

Associate Professor

Literature: American Indian literatures, U.S. and global Southern studies, Native American and Indigenous Studies, American fiction from the beginnings to the 21st century, multi-ethnic American literatures

In 2014, Eric Gary Anderson won a University Teaching Excellence Award with special acknowledgment of his contributions to General Education at Mason. In addition to his book, American Indian Literature and the Southwest: Contexts and Dispositions (University of Texas Press, 1999), he has published more than twenty essays in edited volumes and journals, including pieces in PMLA, American Literary History, Early American Literature, Southern Spaces, Mississippi Quarterly, and South to a New Place. With Taylor Hagood and Daniel Cross Turner, he is a co-editor of Undead Souths: The Gothic and Beyond in Southern Literature and Culture, a collection of essays available now from Louisiana State University Press. From 2012-14, he served as President of The Society for the Study of Southern Literature. At Mason, he coordinates the interdisciplinary minor in Native American & Indigenous Studies and serves as faculty advisor for the GMU Native American and Indigenous Alliance.

Current Research

He is working on two book projects: a monograph that brings together Indigenous Studies and Southern Studies and an edited collection, Swamp Souths: Literary and Cultural Ecologies (with co-editors Kirstin L. Squint, Taylor Hagood, and Anthony Wilson). Other current works in progress include an essay on queer native southern transmissions in the film The Doe Boy and another essay on William Faulkner's Light in August and Stephen Graham Jones's native southern werewolf novel Mongrels.

Selected Publications

Undead Souths: The Gothic and Beyond in Southern Literature and Culture. Co-edited by Eric Gary Anderson, Taylor Hagood, and Daniel Cross Turner. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2015.

"Raising the Indigenous Undead." The Palgrave Handbook of the Southern Gothic. Ed. Susan Castillo Street and Charles L. Crow. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. 323-335.

"Native." Keywords for Southern Studies Ed. Scott Romine and Jennifer Rae Greeson. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2016. 166-178.

"Literary and Textual Histories of the Native South." The Oxford Handbook to the Literature of the U.S. South. Ed. Fred Hobson and Barbara Ladd. New York: Oxford University Press, 2016. 17-32.

"On Native Ground: Indigenous Presences and Countercolonial Strategies in Southern Narratives of Captivity, Removal, and Repossession." Southern Spaces (Aug. 2007). (Available online)

 

Expanded Publication List

"Reimagining 'The South' and 'The North' as Native Space." In "First Nations and Native Souths on Both Sides of the 49th Parallel," an essay cluster with contributions by Sophie McCall, Deanna Reder and Eric Gary Anderson. The Global South 9: 1 (Spring 2015): 39-61 (for the cluster), 51-58 (for my essay in the cluster).

"The Fall of the House of Po' Sandy: Poe, Chesnutt, and Southern Undeadness." In Undead Souths.

"Robert Frost and a 'Native America.'" In Frost in Context. Ed. Mark Richardson. Cambridge University Press, 2014. 233-240.

"Red Crosscurrents: Performative Spaces and Indian Cultural Authority in the Florida Atlantic Captivity Narrative of Jonathan Dickinson." Southern Roots and Routes: Origins, Migrations, Transformations. Special issue of Mississippi Quarterly (65:1, Winter 2012), guest-edited by Susan Donaldson, Suzanne Jones, and Eric Gary Anderson. 17-32.

"The Presence of Early Native Studies: A Response to Stephanie Fitzgerald and Hilary E. Wyss." American Literary History 22:2 (Summer 2010). 280-288.  Jointly published in Early American Literature 45:2 (2010). 251-260.

"Black Atlanta: An Ecosocial Approach to Narratives of the Atlanta Child Murders." PMLA 122.1 (2007): 194-209.

"South to a Red Place: Contemporary American Indian Literature and the Problem of Native/Southern Studies." Mississippi Quarterly 60.1 (2006-07): 5-32.

"Indian Agency: Life of Black Hawk and the Countercolonial Provocations of Early Native American Writing." ESQ: A Journal of the American Renaissance 52.1-2 (2006): 75-104.

"Environed Blood: Ecology and Violence in The Sound and the Fury and Sanctuary." Faulkner and the Ecology of the South: Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha. Ed. Joseph R. Urgo and Ann L. Abadie. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2005. 30-46.

"Captivity and Freedom: Ann Eliza Bleecker, Harriet Prescott Spofford, and Washington Irving's 'Rip Van Winkle.'" A Companion to American Fiction, 1780-1865. Ed. Shirley Samuels. London: Blackwell, 2004. 342-52.

"Situating American Indian Poetry: Place, Community, and the Question of Genre." Speak to Me Words: Essays on Contemporary American Indian Poetry. Ed. Janice Gould and Dean Rader. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2003. 34-55.

"Ecocriticism, Native American Literature, and the South: The Inaccessible Worlds of Linda Hogan's Power." South to a New Place: Region, Literature, Culture. Ed. Suzanne Jones and Sharon Monteith. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2002. 165-83.

American Indian Literature and the Southwest: Contexts and Dispositions. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1999.

 

Courses Taught

NAIS 201: Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies

ENGL 325: Dimensions of Writing and Literature

ENGL 363: Faulkner and Southern Fictions

ENGL 375: Special Topics in American Ethnic Literature: Native American Literature

ENGL 414: Honors Seminar:  Southern Literature

ENGL 610: Proseminar in the Teaching of Literature

ENGL 660: Southern Fictions from Faulkner to Swamplandia!