College of Humanities and Social Sciences
College of Humanities and Social Sciences

College Faculty Members Honored for Excellence in Teaching

DBD with Kamaleddine Tabine

A sunny spring afternoon was an apt setting for the annual George Mason University Teaching Excellence Awards. Presented on April 13, 2015 by the university’s Center for Teaching Excellence, the awards highlight faculty members who are outstanding educators.

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences is delighted that a number of its faculty members were counted among the awardees at Monday’s ceremony. 

Keith Renshaw, of the Department of Psychology, was a recipient of a University Teaching Excellence Award, which honors the significant effort underlying course planning, curriculum development, innovative teaching, advising, and student mentoring.

Cortney Hughes-Rinker, of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and Ricardo Vivancos Pérez, of the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, were named among the university’s Teachers of Distinction, faculty members who were finalists for the Teaching Excellence Award and who are recognized university-wide for their commitment to teaching.

Kamaleddine Tabine, of the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, received one of the university’s Adjunct Teaching Excellence Awards, which denote commitment to excellence in education among the university’s adjunct faculty members. 

Karen Rosenblum, of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, has been honored with the David J. King Award. This award recognizes significant, long-term contributions to the university’s educational excellence. It is named for Dr. David J. King, who served as Mason’s Vice President for Academic Affairs from 1982 until his retirement in 1988. Dr. King is acclaimed for advancing the teaching experience at the university, a quality embodied in this award.

“We are so proud of our award recipients,” says Deborah Boehm-Davis, dean. “It is gratifying to see their hard work recognized, and these awards underscore the continued importance of teaching at George Mason.”

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